Jump to content

Keep getting cda and not music disc


Recommended Posts

Hi, I don't often burn music to a cd and if I do it's in MP3 format but a mate of mine wanted copies of some of my music put onto cds for him to play in his car. His cd player doesn't play MP3 so i'm having to go 'old school'. I've tried Windows Media Player, Windows 10 own burner, this program and two different versions of Ashampoo. Burning Studio 9 and the latest free version. In every case I keep getting a disc full of cda files which won't even play back on my computer. I agreed to do this for him for free because i'd recently bought a pack of 100 cds by mistake. I meant to buy dvds and thought the 100 discs would last me years. Well not at this error rate. I've wasted nine so far!

I've changed the original track format from FLAC to WAV and MP3. All end up the same: CDA!

 

I'm sure it's a box that I'VE ticked/unticked somewhere but I can't work out what. I'm sure when I used to use Ashampoo 9 or Window Media Player you would just select 'audio cd' and whatever you burned would play on any cd player and wouldn't be a cda file.

If it's a factor, i'm using ACU CD-R 52x 700MB silver top printable discs

Can anybody please point out what i'm doing wrong?

It's embarrassing :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

CDA is what you should expect when burning audio discs, this is completely normal. These discs should play fine in actual audio CD players. You should also be able to play them on your computer. If it doesn't work, maybe your file association with CDA is wrong, you should try to open the audio disc from within the media player application to play the disc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Floele. When I googled cda file...  

What is a CDA file?

Files that contain the .cda file extension store CD audio track shortcuts. CDA files are small files that are created for each track of an associated audio CD by the Microsoft Windows operating system.

Files containing the .cda file extension are automatically created when you play an audio CD on your computer. While the files do not contain any actual audio data, they do contain indexing information that pertains to the audio CD that you are playing. Because of this, a user must have the actual audio CD in their hard drive in order for the songs that are indexed in the CDA file to play on their computer.

 Below is a screen shot of the cd after burning. Given that each track is only 1kb in size it would suggest that it doesn't contain any music data which would explain why VLC doesn't play it. 

Thinking about it, the only thing that has fundamentally changed since I last burned a music cd is I've gone from Windows 7 to 10.

I've looked on YouTube for answers and watched people using Windows Media Player burning audio cds exactly the same way as me. I'm confused. And just noticed the 'date modified' date. 01/01/1995? I burned that disc last night!

image.thumb.png.11ef136ebee6c42b732a4b7ca271e24d.png

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're missing the point... I don't need a burned cd to play the music on my computer, I just go straight to the folder with the music and use VLC to play it direct. According to what I've read online, a copy is in my previous post, a cda file doesn't contain the music data. It's some weird link that Microsoft create. If the actual music isn't on the disc then it won't play in my mate's car.

 What I don't understand is why every program I use keeps creating discs with a cda file and not the actual music track.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.